Off Canvas

Another fascinating peek into this area's maritime past has been uncovered as we prepare material for the Abernyte Digital Archive. After uncovering the unfortunate fate of the sailing barque Abernyte we have discovered that there were two ships, built locally, which carried the names Lady Kinnaird and Lord Kinnaird.

The first ship to carry the name Lady Kinnaird was a 350 ton Brigantine built in 1839 in Dundee. It was replaced by a 680 ton Barque built in 1877 by Messrs Brown & Simpson for Mr W.B. Ritchie of Dundee.  Brown and Simpson's boat yard was in the area of the Craig Pier, broadly where the RSS Discovery lies now and where the Fifie sailed from, if you can recall the pre-road bridge era of ferries across to Newport. 

The Lord Kinnaird was built the year before in 1876, also by Messrs Brown & Simpson for Mr W.B. Ritchie of Dundee and was the larger at 843 tons.  Both ships plied their trade on the UK to Australia route carrying mostly cargo but some passengers too.

The Lord Kinnaird was a fine looking ship which continued in service until it was lost near Samoa on 27th November 1903 in poor weather. By this time it had been renamed Kalisto and was owned by a Norwegian company.

Barque Lord Kinnaird Copyright State library of South AustraliaWhen it sailed to Australia in 1878 having taken on cargo in London, we even have the crew list:

 

LORD KINNAIRD

of Dundee, JAMES BLACK, MASTER, Burthen 844 Tons
from the Port of LONDON to SYDNEY, New South Wales, 16th Nov. 1878

SURNAME

GIVEN NAME

STATION

AGE

OF WHAT NATION

STATUS

COMMENTS

BLACK

JAMES

CAPTAIN

 

DUNDEE

CREW

PASSENGERS NIL

KINNETON

WILLIAM

1st MATE

28

DUNDEE

CREW

 

STEPHEN

JAMES

2nd MATE

24

FORFAR

CREW

 

ANDREW

CHARLES

CARPENTER

30

FALMOUTH

CREW

 

WILKIE

PETER

STEWARD

26

DUNDEE

CREW

 

MENZIES

DAVID

STD. & COOK

26

ABROATH

CREW

 

RAMSAY

DAVID

A. B.

20

DUNDEE

CREW

 

ROFFELE

ANTONIO

A. B.

33

ITALY

CREW

 

PARKER

WILLIAM

A. B.

51

LONDON

CREW

 

RENDALL

W.

A. B.

21

LONDON

CREW

 

DAVIS

H.

A. B.

26

HELIGOLAND

CREW

 

LANDMAN

P.

A. B.

25

SWEDEN

CREW

 

LATTEE

D.

A. B.

25

ITALY

CREW

 

BROWN

E.

A. B.

25

JAMAICA

CREW

 

MARTELL

FRANK

A. B.

29

MALTA

CREW

 

ESSOMPICK

GEORGE

O. S.

29

ITALY

CREW

 

JOHNSTON

F. H.

A. B.

19

BELFAST

CREW

 

POLITO

PETER

A. B.

25

ITALY

CREW

 

THROMBERG

GUSTAV j.

A. B.

28

SWEDEN

CREW

 

HENRY

WILLIAM

APPRENTICE

19

CARDIFF

CREW

 

MARTIN

ALEXANDER

APPRENTICE

18

DUNDEE

CREW

 

ROBBINS

JAMES

APPRENTICE

17

DUNDEE

CREW

 

STURROCK

ALEXANDER

APPRENTICE

17

DUNDEE

CREW

 

It is interesting to note that the main skilled crew were all local to this area and the remainder a cross section of nationalities.

The Lady Kinnaird had a much shorter career, being lost off south Australia in 1880, The Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser reported: 

"Lady Kinnaird, under the command of Laws, left Port Pirie at 4.00 am on 19 January 1880 bound for the United Kingdom with a cargo about 8400 bags of wheat. During the afternoon of 20 January, the wind direction changed to the south along with an increase in speed. At 8.00 pm, the wind conditions were described as ‘furious squalls’. The barque continued its course into the southerly wind. At about midnight, when about to do a planned change of course to the east or the southeast, it was discovered that the barque was close to the west coast of Spencer Gulf. As the barque did not respond to a change of course, the main anchor was released but its cable failed and before a second anchor could be released, the barque ran aground. At sunrise, the crew realised that the barque had run aground south of Cape Burr about 0.75 miles (1.21 km) from the shore. The crew exited the wrecked vessel without loss of life and made way in lifeboats to the nearby shore where a camp was set up."

The Marine Board of South Australia held an inquiry in the loss of the barque and on 9 February 1880, found the master, Alexander Laws, to be negligent. A further inquiry presided over by four magistrates was convened where evidence from expert witnesses was heard. On 25 February 1880, the inquiry found Captain Laws not guilty of the charge of negligence. having found that the submerged rock (now known as Lady Kinnaird Rock) on which the Lady Kinnaird ran aground,  was at low water found to have a minimum depth of water above the rock at 1 fathom (6.0 ft; 1.8 m) while the published chart advised a depth of 6 fathoms (36 ft; 11 m). 

Timber recovered from the wreck site is reported as being used to built a water store known as Lady Kinnaird Tanks about 6.6 kilometres (4.1 miles) north of Port Neill.  The Lady Kinnaird's anchor was recovered by local divers and now sits on display at Port Neill.

"Port Neill Lady Kinnaird anchor" by Original uploader was Tirin at en.wikipedia - Transferred from en.wikipedia. Licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0 via Commons - https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Port_Neill_Lady_Kinnaird_anchor.jpg#/media/File:Port_Neill_Lady_Kinnaird_anchor.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sign Wreck of the Lady Kinnaird

 

The wreck of the Lady Kinnaird is now a popular although controlled dive site, which you can see here:

 

 

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